• Tumby Bay Museum

    Housed in a circa 1950s transportable school building divided into three sections containing items reflecting early pioneer life and the social history of the area, the museum is dedicated to CL Alexander, founder of the National Trust's country branches.

Visitors enter the museum from West Terrace into the main display area which contains memorabilia of local transport, churches, shipping, shops, early settlers, agriculture, entertainment, hospital, war and various household items.  See ship’s models and collections of sea shells. Discover Tumby Bay’s connection with the famous pastoralist and philanthropist John Tennant Mortlock and see Sir Charles Todd’s walking stick.

The second section contains items relating to saddle making, communications, council history and development, as well as various district and sporting photographs and trophies. Learn how Tumby Bay was first developed as a shipping port for the Burrawing Copper Mine at Lipson from 1872-92.  You can use a real old fashioned telephone.

The final room is furnished with period furniture as a kitchen, laundry, sitting room and bedroom with clothing and pioneer memorabilia to match the period including a fascinating wardrobe hand carved by Colonel Lovell whilst headmaster at Lipson School.

The museum is run by the Tumby Bay branch of the National Trust. The group meets on the fourth Tuesday of every month (except December) 9.30am at the Museum.

Adult: $5.00
Children: $1.00

Saturday 10am-12noon
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
10am-5pm
Friday, Sunday, Monday 2-4pm

Pat Carr
08 8688 4210
0428 350 670
[email protected]
PO Box 215 Tumby Bay SA 5605

Tumby Bay Museum

Housed in a circa 1950s transportable school building divided into three sections containing items reflecting early pioneer life and the social history of the area, the museum is dedicated to CL Alexander, founder of the National Trust's country branches.